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HalfDollarMayflower

Trunk Lock cylinder replacement

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With the handle in the normal closed position, look in the area below the lock for a small hole. To remove the lock cylinder, you will need to use a rigid wire to insert into the hole to depress the latch that retains the lock cylinder. With the spring loaded latch depressed, then use the lock key to turn and remove the cylinder. When you give the handle to the plater, make sure they seal off the area where the lock cylinder goes and the ketch area from plating. My plater failed to seal off the area for the ketch and it was plated to to handle. In order to free the ketch, I came close to breaking my newly chromed handle.

Dana

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Dana,

Thanks for the reply! For whatever reason, my key will not turn the cylinder, so I guess I need to find another trunk handle...

I'm also not sure what you mean by the 'ketch'....is that the square post that actually engages the latch mechanism?

Thanks!

With the handle in the normal closed position, look in the area below the lock for a small hole. To remove the lock cylinder, you will need to use a rigid wire to insert into the hole to depress the latch that retains the lock cylinder. With the spring loaded latch depressed, then use the lock key to turn and remove the cylinder. When you give the handle to the plater, make sure they seal off the area where the lock cylinder goes and the ketch area from plating. My plater failed to seal off the area for the ketch and it was plated to to handle. In order to free the ketch, I came close to breaking my newly chromed handle.

Dana

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Dana,

Thanks for the reply! For whatever reason, my key will not turn the cylinder, so I guess I need to find another trunk handle...

I'm also not sure what you mean by the 'ketch'....is that the square post that actually engages the latch mechanism?

Thanks!

My spelling is wrong, the word is catch, not ketch. I am not refering to the square shaft attached to the handle. When the lock cylinder is turned with the key, it moves a small metal peice in the handle in or out. When the metal peice is in the out position, it prevents the handle from turning, thus locking the handle. If you remove the handle assembly from the car, by looking on the back side of it you will be able to see a slot in the mounting casting. When the handle is locked, this slot is occupied by the metal peice mentioned above. In order to remove the handle from the mounting casting, there is a retaing ring that has to be removed. This retaining ring will be needed for reassembly after plating. Before you give up on the handle, you might try soaking the lock assembly along with the catch assembly in some kind of solution to free up any possible corrosion and or rust.

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Gotcha! Any ideas on how to get the little retaining ring off?

Gary

My spelling is wrong, the word is catch, not ketch. I am not refering to the square shaft attached to the handle. When the lock cylinder is turned with the key, it moves a small metal peice in the handle in or out. When the metal peice is in the out position, it prevents the handle from turning, thus locking the handle. If you remove the handle assembly from the car, by looking on the back side of it you will be able to see a slot in the mounting casting. When the handle is locked, this slot is occupied by the metal peice mentioned above. In order to remove the handle from the mounting casting, there is a retaing ring that has to be removed. This retaining ring will be needed for reassembly after plating. Before you give up on the handle, you might try soaking the lock assembly along with the catch assembly in some kind of solution to free up any possible corrosion and or rust.

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The retaining ring is held in place by the two indentations on it. I used a rotary file to remove some of the metal on each indentation to the point where I could pry or drive it off. When I reassembled the unit, I was able to use the original indentations again to retain the handle. If you replate the door handles, they use the same retaining ring. The tool I used for the rotary file was a Dremel, but one could also use a hand drill.

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Tones52   

I was able to pick up a nicer backing plate for my '52's trunk but didn't know how to take my original apart. Fortunately, I came across this thread.

Dana - when you filed that indentation on that retaining collar, how much of it did you remove? I'm thinking just enough to stick a small screwdriver to lift the sides maybe? And ws the filing done on one of the sides of that indentation or right down the middle of it?  I've included a couple of pix. Thanks

Tony

Trunk Handle Inside.jpg

Trunk Handle Outside.jpg

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I think I filed down the center of the indentation.  You could use a round file to do the job.  A screw driver may work but you should also try channel lock type  pliers and rotate the securing ring.  Some folks have success with just the pliers rotating the ring less than 90 degrees.  Not necessary to file away all the metal on the ring in the depressed area.

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Tones52   

Thanks Dana. My friend Mike with the 50/51 Plymouth (51 with a 50 front end) sent me this link to a neat series of You Tube videos which I could imagine watching if I was in an auto shop class in the early 50's. Mind you, it's a black and white film strip slide show with what sounds like a vinyl record audio explantion. Mind you, I'm old enough to have seen film stops both as a student and later in my early years as a teacher. :lol:

Anyway about 9 minutes into this video there's a fix related to our trunk locks that includes your suggestion of turning that retaining ring or ferrule with pliers. I'll post that link here in case it is helpful to others. There's a whole series of these videos which are pretty darn neat. Dang, the internet can sometimes be pretty good! Again thanks for the help. ;)

Vintage Master Tech 1950 Slide Show for 1950 Mopars

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I just watched the film on the Trunk lock repair. Great info, also there is some great info on other problems.

Thanks for posting.

50 DELUXE

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